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Convert Excel Spreadsheet To Access Database 2010

Convert Excel Spreadsheet To Access Database 2010 – There are several ways to exchange data between Microsoft Office Access and Microsoft Office Excel.There are several ways to exchange data between Microsoft Office Access and Microsoft Office Excel.
To bring Access data to Excel, you can copy them from an Access datasheet and paste them into an Excel spreadsheet, connect to an Access database from an Excel spreadsheet, or export Access data to a worksheet Of Excel calculation.
To bring data from Excel to Access, you can copy them from an Excel spreadsheet and paste them into an Access data sheet, import an Excel spreadsheet into an Access table, or create a link to an Excel spreadsheet From an Access table.
NOTES:
The term “import” has two different meanings in Excel and Access. In Excel, it means creating a permanent connection with the data that can be updated. In Access, it means to insert all the data at the same time, but without a permanent data connection.
You can not save an Excel workbook as an Access database. Neither Excel nor Access provide the functionality needed to create an Access database from Excel data.
What would you like to do?

  1. Working with Access Data in Excel
  2. Working with Excel data in Access
  3. Working with Access Data in Excel

You may want to work with Access data in an Excel workbook to take advantage of data analysis and charting features, flexibility in presentation and data design, or the multitude of functions that are not available in Access.
Copy data from Access in Excel
From Access, you can copy data from a datasheet view and then paste them into an Excel spreadsheet.
Start Access and open the table, query, or form that contains the records that you want to copy.
On the Home tab, click View, and then click Datasheet View.
Select the records you want to copy.
If you want to select specific columns, drag the headers of adjacent columns.
On the Home tab, in the Clipboard group, click Copy Picture of the button.
Excel Ribbon Image
Keyboard shortcut You can also press CTRL + C.
Start Excel and open the worksheet in which you want to paste the data.
Click the upper-left corner of the worksheet area where you want the first field name to appear.
To prevent copied records from overwriting existing data, make sure that the spreadsheet does not contain data under the cell you are about to click on, or to the right.
On the Home tab, in the Clipboard group, click Paste Picture of the button.
Keyboard shortcut You can also press Ctrl + V.
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Export data from Access to Excel

Using the Access Export Wizard, you can export an Access database object, such as a table, query, or form, or selected records in a view to an Excel spreadsheet. When you perform an export operation, you can save the details for later use and even schedule the export operation to run automatically at specific intervals.

The following describes some common data export scenarios from Access to Excel:

Your department or group uses Access and Excel to work with the data. These are stored in Access databases, but use Excel to analyze and distribute the results of the analysis. Your team exports the data to Excel when needed, but would like the process to be more effective.

He uses Access very often, but his boss prefers to see reports in Excel. Periodically, you have to copy the data to Excel, but you would like to automate this process to save time.

For more information about exporting data from Access to Excel, see the Access Help system.

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Connect to Access data from Excel

To bring Access data that can be updated in Excel, you can create a connection, normally stored in an Office data connection file (.odc), with the Access database and retrieve all the data in a table or query . The main advantage of creating a connection with Access data instead of importing them is that you can periodically analyze this data in Excel without having to copy or export them constantly from Access. After connecting to the data, you can also automatically update Excel workbooks from the original Access database provided that the database is updated with new information. For example, you may want to update an Excel budget report that you distribute each month so that it contains the data for the current month.

Click the cell where you want to place the data in the Access database.

On the Data tab, in the Get External Data group, click From Access.

Excel Ribbon Image

In the Look in list, locate and double-click the Access database that you want to import.

In the Select Table dialog box, click the table or query that you want to import, and then click OK.

In the Import Data dialog box, do the following:

Under Select how you want to view this data in the workbook, do one of the following:

To view the data as a table, select Table.

To view the data as a PivotTable report, select PivotTable Report.

To view the data as a PivotChart report and PivotTable report, select PivotTable and Chart Report.

Optionally, click Properties to define the options for updating, formatting, and designing the imported data, and then click OK.

In Where do you want to put the data ?, do one of the following:

To return the data to the selected location, click Existing Worksheet.

To return the data to the upper-left corner of the new worksheet, click New Worksheet.

Click OK.

Excel places the range of external data in the specified location.

 

Working with Excel data in Access

You may want to work with Excel data in an Access database to take advantage of the data management, security, or multiuser features of Access. Although Access contains many useful features, there are two of them that are especially suitable for Excel data:

Reports If you are familiar with Access report design and want to summarize or organize Excel data in this report type, you can create an Access report. For example, you can create more flexible reports, such as group and summary reports, printed labels, and graphical reports.

Forms If you want to use a form to search or display data in Excel, you can create an Access form. For example, you can create an Access form to display fields in a different order than the columns in the spreadsheet, or to easily see a long row of data on the screen.

For more information about working with Access forms and reports, see the Access Help system.

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Copy data from Excel to Access

From Excel, you can copy data into a spreadsheet view and then paste it into an Access data sheet.

NOTE: If you paste data from multiple fields in a worksheet into a worksheet, make sure that the columns have the same order as the data you want to copy. When you pasted data from multiple fields in a form, Access paste them into fields with the same name as the source fields, regardless of how they are sorted in the form. If the data you want to copy contains fields that do not exist on the destination form, Access asks if you want to copy only the fields with matching names. If there is no matching field name, Access pastes the fields based on the tab order of the form, which may not be the order you want. If the source field names are different from the target field names, you may want to paste the data into a datasheet instead of a form.

Start Excel and open the worksheet that contains the data you want to copy.

Select the rows you want to copy.

On the Home tab, in the Clipboard group, click Copy Picture of the button.

Excel Ribbon Image

Keyboard shortcut You can also press CTRL + C.

Start Access and open the table, query, or form where you want to paste the rows.

On the Datasheet tab, in the Views group, click View, and then click Datasheet View.

Access ribbon image

Do one of the following:

To replace records, select them, and then on the Home tab, in the Clipboard group, click Paste Picture of the button.

Access ribbon image

Keyboard shortcut You can also press Ctrl + V.

To attach the data as new records, on the Home tab, in the Clipboard group, click Paste Attached Data on the Edit menu.

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Import data from Excel to Access

To store Excel data in an Access database and use and maintain this data in Access from now on, you can import the data. When importing data, Access stores them in a new or existing table without modifying them. You can only import one worksheet at a time during an import operation. To import data from multiple worksheets, repeat the import operation for each worksheet.

Here are some common scenarios for importing Excel data into Access:

Use Excel very often, but from now on you want to use Access to work with this data. You want to move data from Excel spreadsheets to one or more Access databases.

Your department or workgroup uses Access, but occasionally receives data in Excel format that must be combined with Access databases. You want to import these Excel spreadsheets into the database when you receive them.

You use Access to manage the data, but the weekly reports you receive from the rest of your team are Excel books. You want to streamline the import process to make sure that the data is imported every week at a specific time to the database.

For more information about importing data from Excel to Access, see the Access Help system.

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Create a link with Excel data from Access

You can link a range of Excel data in an Access database as a table. Use this system if you plan to maintain the range in Excel, but you also want it to be available in Access. This type of link is created from the Access database, not from Excel.

When you create a link to a spreadsheet or an Excel named range, Access creates a new table that is linked to the source cells. Any changes you make to the source cells in Excel are reflected in the linked table. However, you can not modify the contents of the corresponding table in Access. If you want to add, modify, or delete data, you must make changes to the source file.

Here are some common scenarios for linking to an Excel spreadsheet from Access:

You want to keep your data in Excel spreadsheets, but you want to be able to use the powerful Access query and reporting features.

Your department or workgroup uses Access, but it works with data from external sources that are in Excel spreadsheets. You do not want to keep copies of external data, but you want to be able to work with them in Access.

For more information about how to link data from Access to Excel, see the Access Help system.

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